Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/jgatchfa/public_html/forum/Sources/Load.php(225) : runtime-created function on line 3

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/jgatchfa/public_html/forum/Sources/Load.php(225) : runtime-created function on line 3

Deprecated: preg_replace(): The /e modifier is deprecated, use preg_replace_callback instead in /home/jgatchfa/public_html/forum/Sources/Load.php(225) : runtime-created function on line 3
Gatchaman Fiction Archive :: Transmute!
Reviews For Best Laid Plans
You must login (register) to review.
Reviewer: Candi Gomez Signed starstarstarstarstar [Report This]
Date: 05/05/2010 5:40 PM Title: Chapter 10

I love your Sam stories!

I do think Jason should've been smacked. He ran the operation quite well until the 'turns on one operative' bit. *snort* Mark did a marvelous job of sorting out the rat's tail nest he was handed, and I'm glad that Force 7 members got a chance to really show what they could do!

About the color filters: it really dependes on the person. A couple years back in the Fortean Times, there was a short articles about a woman who could only read upside down...until she started using orange filters. Go figure. I've read other stories.  The filters work, but color and efficiency vary from person to person and disorder to disorder.

The first time I read about someone being dyslexic -besides cutesy for-5-and-younger books- was an article a guy wrote about his dad. It was years ago, but I do remember him saying that his dad was an excellent student, except for not being able to read. He was supposed to get an award -but it went to the runner-up instead, someone who could read. *smacks school committee who decided that* But he also mentions that his father could and still did incredible woodwork. He had the talent to take an ordinary chunk of wood and turn it into a work of art. Doesn't sound disabled or stupid to me. Interestingly enough, one of the things that helped him learn to read as an adult was using big type and blue paper.

I also read, in Reader's Digest many years ago, of a woman who, as she got older, had trouble with her ability to make out words on a page or a computer screen; everything on the page/screen eventually faded to a uniform grey. But when going through her high-functioning mentally handicapped brother's (and that's a whole 'nother story) belongings after his being hit by a car, she found his favorite item: a piece of amber-toned glass. When she looked through it, she could read again! She ordered a pair of tinted glasses. (She didn't quite break the door going into the eyeglass crafter's store...) ;p

One of the best things I thinks been done for people with these disorders is the way on computers the 'paper' and text color and the text size and type can be changed until the person finds a combination that works for them.

You are such a good writer. And I love the way Sam's so realistically protrayed. Keep up the good work!

You must login (register) to review.